How Much Does it Cost to Upgrade an Electrical Panel?

Are you interested in an electrical panel upgrade? You can expect to pay from $770 to $1,750 typically, for both mterials and labor.

Cost to upgrade an electrical panel varies, depending on these factors:

  • The amperage of your new panel
  • Accessibility of your electrical system
  • Condition of existing wiring and other electrical components

Why Upgrade Your Electrical Panel?

Home electrical needs have increased a lot over the years. We're using electrical and electronic devices that were hardly even dreamed of a few generations ago.

The electrical panel is like Grand Central Station for the electricity used by your household. It is in charge of distributing the power received from the electric company to the various circuits throughout your house.

A 20 to 40 amp electrical panel just isn't enough anymore. The average American home needs at least a 100-amp panel. 200 amps or even 400 amps will be preferable, to cover all your electrical requirements.

Get an emergency electrical panel upgrade when:

  1. You frequently experience tripped breakers or blown fuses.
  2. Your outlets are two-pronged (non-grounded).
  3. Your overhead lights and lamps flicker.
  4. You hear buzzing or crackling from your electrical system.
  5. Your insurance provider demands it.

Cost Breakdown

  • Materials -- Materials include the new electrical panel and incidental supplies such as fittings, etc.
  • Labor -- Work out with your electrician to pay either an hourly rate (usually with a minimum fee) or per-job fee. If additional components of your electrical system -- such as wiring, grounding, circuits, outlets, and fixtures -- need to be replaced expect the labor cost to increase, especially if walls need to be taken down (and later rebuilt) in order to allow access.

Get the Most for Your Money

Upgrading your electrical panel is a major undertaking, which can create a lot of mess and upheaval in your home. Schedule the upgrade prior to moving in to your home or during structural renovations if possible.

Investigate whether your local utility company will cut off the power to your home until your new panel can be inspected. If so, prepare to be without electricity for a period of several hours up to a day or two.

Get a high quality electrical panel replacement and ensure that your homeowners' policy will cover you in case of an electrical accident. Hire only a licensed electrician for your panel upgrade and make sure he (or she) pulls the correct permit.